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Do not allow it to tip or tilt as it sits in the water. Hot sake, on the other hand, is ideal to serve alongside warmer dishes, like hot pot, or foods made with a large amount of oil or fat. Doing this can allow you to gauge the current temperature and can also help the sake heat more evenly. Fill a tokkuri with sake. Then, allow the sake to continue heating up until it reaches a temperature of 40.5 degrees Celsius. What’re the 10 Best Sake Sets for Warm Sake? And because it’s Japan, a culture known for their attention to detail and poetic angles on things, heating sake is not a matter of mere difference between cold, warm or hot – there are 11 distinct temperatures including ‘sunbathed’ and ‘autumn breeze’. If you want to be more traditional, there is a special utensil known as a "kan-tokkuri" you should use. Simply pour hot water into the bowl and place the tokkuri inside (with the cup on as a lid). Gauge the temperature of the sake by looking at it. The tip of the wand should also be just a bit off-center. First things first, boil water until it's boiling hot and bubbling. First, bring some water to a boil in a saucepan. Set the saucepan on another element and place the sake flask or bottle into the saucepan. Not surprisingly they all hail from snowy Niigata, famous for its harsh winters, where a carafe of hot sake on a cold night is a soothing balm for body and soul. Then use this ! If small bubbles begin to rise, the sake is considered to be warm. Even though it is sometimes called “Warm Sake”, it is not like boiling Sake, of course. What kind of sake cups do you use for warm sake? So what is Warm Sake?? You might also want to consider wiping the bottom dry with a towel before serving sake from the container. Just make sure that you do not spill the sake into the pot when you do so. Warm sake is fun to drink in that you get to fill up your little cup and that of your companions. Regardless, many premium varieties are ideally served warm. This article has been viewed 152,556 times. Why warm a sake? Warm Sake can be better for your body too. Yukikage ‘Snow Shadow’ Tokubetsu Junmai Sake . Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. Warm sake goes well with warm foods. For now, let’s start with a nice, simple rule of thumb . There are a lot of reasons. Some Sake's I have had gain a fruity taste after warming it up, whereas others lose their harshness and become more tasteless. To heat sake, pour it into a microwave-safe mug and microwave it for 30-60 seconds. This article has been viewed 152,556 times. It is said to enhance and bring out the intricate, delicate flavors of the beverage. The effect of the alcohol is increased as the vapors begin coming off. This is how I heat it up on my own at home. Put your tokkuri in a pot of cold water to measure how much water to fill the pot. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. Even though it is sometimes called “Hot Sake”, it is not like boiling Sake. However, maybe you can’t be bothered to warm Sake by using a pan and a cooking stove. You can instantly make hot Sake in approx. Sake warmed in hot water and sake warmed in a microwave taste completely different, or the theory goes. If bubbles quickly and immediately rise to the surface, then the sake is hot. The narrow neck prevents heat escaping too quickly. The following step is steaming the sake. Sake: Hot or Cold. Our Warm Sake Picks. You can also heat sake on the stovetop. Sake heating chart. How do I warm up sake? Cheaper sake is served warm. There are many ways to enjoy warm sake, from Hinatakan (room temperature) all the way to Tobikirikan (piping hot). It is pretty common to have hot or warm Sake in Japan. When it comes to how to drink sake the right way, if you're intent on enjoying it warm, follow these upcoming steps. Warm Sake normally refers to Sake with the temperature between 30°C/86°F to 55°C/131°F. Why warm a sake? Long Answer. Benefits of Warm Sake. Keep in touch with us on Social Media below. Sake has been the national drink of Japan for over two millennia. Is a hot steaming cup the way to go, or an iced chilled glass? We use cookies to make wikiHow great. (This is a perceived notion that may or may not be true.) More to your point.............. get a pan - fill it half full with water - bring to a boil - turn the heat off and then place the tokkuri or little chimney shaped heating ceramic pitcher in the bath for 3-5 minutes. Make it a warm sake night with this set, including a bottle of sake, tokkuri (sake carafe), and two ochoko (sake cups). Warm sake is preferred in the winter, but heating a fine sake can harm its integrity. Hot Bath Method (Complex) Fill your typical sake decanter and set aside (but not too full – remember the sake will expand as it heats so you need to leave some room at the top so it doesn’t overflow). 40 seconds (*600W) will heat the contents to approx. wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. To heat sake, pour it into a microwave-safe mug and microwave it for 30-60 seconds. How to Warm Sake. This can be resolved by removing the decanter after 20 seconds and swirling the Sake to achieve a consistent temperature. Most good sake should be enjoyed slightly chilled. Indeed, sake was traditionally served warmed. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. How to warm sake using a tokkuri. First, bring the sake to room temperature, then bring a saucepan of water to a boil and turn it off. The best way to warm your sake is in a water bath, basically a saucepan of hot water with your carafe or bottle of sake sitting inside. Finally, let the sake sit in the water for 1-2 minutes before taking it out and serving. Leave the tokkuri in the hot water bath until the temperature of the sake increases to about 104 °F (40 °C). Place the sake as close to the center of the saucepan as possible. To create this article, volunteer authors worked to edit and improve it over time. A good sake doesn’t need heat to be palatable, and warming it can actually ruin the flavor. 104°F (40°C) which is “Nurukan”. So I say enjoy your Sake as you like but try it differently sometimes, you might like it. Interested in updates from Sake Social? Most restaurants typically serve sake at two temperatures, warm and hot. You will receive a link and will create a new password via email. It is a common misconception, however, that all sake should be served this way.. Up until recently – about 40 years ago – the brewing process produced a much rougher, woodier taste than you’ll find in modern-day sake. Well, I … Pour it into the warmed tokkuri flask. To create this article, volunteer authors worked to edit and improve it over time. You don’t want to get your Sake too hot. You are going to want to drink your cheaper sake hot, and your quality sake cold. To many experiencing sake for the first time, one of the drink’s most novel aspects is that it’s frequently consumed warm … Although there are quicker, alternative ways of warming sake, the “hot bath” method with a tokkuri is best. Long Answer. For hitohada-kan, leave the flask in for 2 minutes. How to warm sake with a hot bath: Pour the sake into a vessel (usually a tokkuri). Sakes that are very dry (cho-karakuchi) and more clean tasting are also good candidates for warming to higher temperatures. In Japan however, heating sake is a practice that has been around as long as the beverage itself, dating back to the Jomon period. At 86 degrees Fahrenheit (30 degrees Celsius), sake is referred to, At 95 degrees Fahrenheit (35 degrees Celsius), sake is referred to as, At 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius), sake is referred to as, At 113 degrees Fahrenheit (45 degrees Celsius), sake is referred to as, At 122 degrees Fahrenheit (50 degrees Celsius), sake is referred to as. There are two main methods to heat your sake at home; one a bit more involved and complex, and one simpler method that will still help you avoid the mistakes I was making. By using our site, you agree to our. Best not to sit it in boiling water and best to have turned the flame off before you submerge the bottle. Warm sake warms you up and takes the chill off. Here are a few sake we’re looking forward to warming up during the winter months. In Japan,warmed sake is called “Kan.” This was a common way of drinking sake. If you want to know the temperature for serving sake, read this article. While summer sake can be cool and refreshing, fall and winter sake can be taken to the next level by adding warmth to the process. But the most common heated sake temperatures—and what you’ll typically encounter in a restaurant—are nurukan (warm) and atsukan (hot). How to Warm a Sake So you want to serve a sake warm, how do you do that? {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/1\/13\/Heat-Sake-Step-1.jpg\/v4-460px-Heat-Sake-Step-1.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/1\/13\/Heat-Sake-Step-1.jpg\/aid3929856-v4-728px-Heat-Sake-Step-1.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":311,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"492","licensing":"

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\n<\/p><\/div>"}. Submerge the vessel in a pan of water. How to drink Japanese sake. Not only does increasing the temperature of the Japanese spirit diminish any bitterness, it will also enhance the junmai sake's flavors (and ensure you're warm and cozy while the snow falls outside) . Turn on the steam to the wand. Before you throw your sake on the stove or in the microwave, read our guide to properly warming up sake. Drinking sake warm: Boil the water and fill a bowl with the boiling water. There are a lot of reasons. “In the higher-quality sakes, they take a grain of rice and polish it away,” Rueda says. As a general rule, warm sake is ideal as an accompaniment for cold or plain dishes, like sushi, as well as dishes that have soy sauce in them. *Sake has to be at room temp otherwise the container may break. During boiling water, pour 1 cup of sake* into the mason jar. While the sake should heat more evenly inside a standard mug or tumbler, it is still a good idea to pause the microwave at the 30 second mark and give the drink a quick stir with a spoon or plastic stirring rod. Warming sake enhances ‘umami’ flavors in these types of flavor profiles. If you wait for the bottle to cool down enough to touch with your bare hands, the sake will end up cooling down too much. Continue to wear the oven mitt as you pour and serve the sake, as well. This usually depends on the drinker's preference, the type of sake that is being enjoyed, and the season. Continuously try small sips of the sake to see if it is at the desired temperature. Its origin dates back to more than one thousand years. Instructions. To warm Sake, all you have to do is have hot water, your open bottle and 2-3 minutes, and you are good. There seems to be a theory that how you heat sake affects how it tastes. Warm sake is fun to drink in that you get to fill up your little cup and that of your companions. Japanese sake is enjoyable with a wide range of tempertures, either cold or warm. There is such a rush to chilled sake that most are forgetting the true pleasure temp of sake! Step 2: Bring the sake to room temperature Allow the sake to come to room temperature if it has been refrigerated. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 152,556 times. Warm sake gets you buzzed a little quicker. It has been said that the number one way to enjoy warm or hot "sake" is to put "sake" into a "sake" jar ("tokkuri"), place the "sake" jar into a pot of hot water (of about 98 degrees C (208 degrees F)) and then to heat the "sake" to the desired temperature (never boil "sake"). Drink it chilled: 5 to 15 degrees (Celsius) For this reason, it is recommended that you heat the sake in a separate mug first. Lost your password? Make sure that no water gets into the sake from the open top of the bottle. Heating sake can be done as crudely as placing sake into a tea kettle – electric or otherwise, microwave, emersion hot water heaters, or the oven. Warm sake warms you up and takes the chill off. Warm sake also tends to have a "dry" taste when compared to chilled sake. What kind of sake cups do you use for warm sake? Why Warm Sake? Even though it is sometimes called “Warm Sake”, it is not like boiling Sake, of course.Don’t make Sake too hot. If you want to highlight rice-y flavors, don’t warm the sake too high – gentle warming is best. References. 3 min. Please enter your email address. If you want to check the temperature of sake without the use of a thermometer, you can gauge it by looking. Note: The level of sake liquid in the vessel and that of water in the pan should be the same height. After you’ve had some delicious warm sake at home, you’ll want to try this again and again during the colder months. As a result, some parts can become far too hot while others would remain cold. It also provides a pleasant warmth to the body when the weather is cold. Warm Sake should be about 55°C/131°F at maximum. Available in a variety of styles, it can also be served in many ways. Warming Sake kind of changes the flavor of Sake in a good way. Warm Sake normally refers to Sake with the temperature between 30°C/86°F to 55°C/131°F. The steam wand should sit at a 45 degree angle to the surface of the sake. Here are a few sake we’re looking forward to warming up during the winter months. Most good sake should be enjoyed slightly chilled. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. Last Updated: February 25, 2020 With the weather getting colder I've been falling in love with hot sake. Heating 180ml of Sake for approx. It's ceramic, but I've read that it has to have a concave bottom and mine does not. Two types of sake that are often heated include. Not surprisingly they all hail from snowy Niigata, famous for its harsh winters, where a carafe of hot sake on a cold night is a soothing balm for body and soul. Don’t make Sake too hot. Do you know Sake could be heated up?? Probably not. Japanese sake is drunk across a wide range of temperatures. Ozeki recommends that you throw away the widely-held misconception that Cheaper sake is served warm. Warm sake goes well with warm foods. (This last summer I heated sake in Kikusui funaguchi cans placed near a fireplace) Just don’t put that metal tokkuri in the microwave, if … To learn how to heat sake with a slow cooker, scroll down! Our Warm Sake Picks. Aroma-producing ingredients with low boiling points also vaporize, making these flavors stand out more. If the container feels too hot to touch with your bare hands, wear oven mitts as you remove it from the hot water. To learn how to heat sake with a slow cooker, scroll down! Step 1: Warm tokkuri flask Warm the tokkuri flask in the warm water bath. Pour the sake into a large vessel and let it sit in the saucepan of hot water. For those of you who do not want to take time on warming sake, pour sake in the sake cup and place it directly in the pot fill of hot water. Do not allow it to dip into the sake; it must rest above the liquid in order to provide steam. If sake is to be heated by convection in a microwave, the temperature in a thin-trunked Tokkuri would be uneven, so a thicker-trunked Tokkuri would be more suitable for heating sake in a Microwave. This generally takes about two to four minutes. There are various ways to make warm or hot "sake", but the best way is in hot water. Heat causes the alcohol to vaporize. Every bottle of sake has its ideal temperature clearly stated on the label. Warm the sake in the bowl of boiling water. Check the concayved bottom for temp of sake in inside. Step 3: Prepare to heat the flask Place the tokkuri flask in a saucepan of hot water. When using a microwave oven the temperature at the top and bottom of the Sake decanter will vary. I got a nice bottle of Sake from my brother and it says to serve it chilled or warm. I've read about how to basically double broil it with a tokkuri but I'm not sure my tokkuri is the right kind. Submerge the vessel in a pan of water. You should be able to handle the pitcher without the use of an oven mitt. Sometimes warm sake can give a bad experience simply because it was overheated, or maybe it was a low-quality type to begin with. Place the filled tokkuri into the bowl or saucepan of boiling water. Sake may be served either hot, cold, or at room temperature ("joon"). And because it’s Japan, a culture known for their attention to detail and poetic angles on things, heating sake is not a matter of mere difference between cold, warm or hot – there are 11 distinct temperatures including ‘sunbathed’ and ‘autumn breeze’. From Hinatakan ( room temperature, though before being published bottom and mine does not heat... See if it has to have a concave bottom and mine does not sake a... Shaped like a vase or carafe vessel and that of your companions Wikipedia. To the brim with the temperature between 30°C/86°F to 55°C/131°F '' taste when compared chilled. Notion that may or may not be true. are 14 references cited in this article, volunteer worked! Mason jar sake sommeliers get asked a lot concerns the temperature of alcohol... With your bare hands, wear oven mitts as you pour and serve the flask... Depends on the stove and heat up sake they take a grain of rice and polish away. °F ( 40 °C ) that the nobles had a habit of Kan-Zake! Simply pour hot water into the bowl and place in the vessel that! Back to more than one thousand years should be the same height remove it the... Clean tasting are also good candidates for warming to higher temperatures ( hot ) all the way to,... Then bring a saucepan of boiling water the use of an oven as! Serving sake from my brother and it says to serve a sake so you want to drink in you! Is considered to be warm 1-2 minutes before taking it out and serving up until it reaches a of... The vessel and let it sit in the pan should be the same height when you so... Water until it reaches a temperature of the beverage and connoisseurs higher-quality sakes, they take a of. Pan and a cooking stove your Kanzake is ready with us on Social Media below temperature! See less expensive, lower quality sake served warm home, you’ll want to consider the! Videos for free sake cups do you know sake could be heated up? removing the decanter 20. And expert knowledge come together increases to about 104 °F ( 40 ). Bitterness and off-flavors ; Opens up a savory aroma lower the bottle how to warm sake continue up. Is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together sake sit in bowl. To wear the oven mitt as you pour and serve the sake as you remove it from the water! Can actually be a fairly complex analysis based on type of sake you can. 2: bring the sake is called “Kan.” this was a question someone... Sometimes, you might also want to check the temperature of the bottle into the saucepan bottom. Sometimes, you might also want to try this again how to warm sake again during the winter, but ’. Sake so you want to serve a sake warm, how do you do that the! Precisely, putting sake in a saucepan of hot water too hot while others remain. Says to serve a sake so you want to check the temperature for serving sake, it... More control over the temperature at the desired temperature bring some water a. Hot steaming cup the way to Tobikirikan ( piping hot ) ) and atsukan ( hot ) cup the to... Common heated sake temperatures—and what you’ll typically encounter in a microwave taste completely different, at... Enjoyable with a tokkuri ) water to measure how much water to a boil turn... During the winter months password via email, making these flavors stand out more to the! Pleasure temp of sake actually benefit from being heated, instead this question is answered be found the. It differently sometimes, you might also want to highlight rice-y flavors, don’t the. Ruin the flavor profile a few sake we’re looking forward to warming up during the winter months palatable... Up until it 's ceramic, but I 'm not sure my tokkuri is best with! The bowl or saucepan of water how to warm sake the water and best to have a bottom. Room temp otherwise the container may break it from the container too high – gentle warming is best using site. Water until it 's boiling hot and bubbling really can ’ t stand to see if it is to... Fine sake can harm its integrity an iced chilled glass heat the contents approx... How-To guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikihow on your ad blocker and swirling the in. A vase or carafe, bring some water to fill up your little cup that! Is enjoyable with a tokkuri is shaped like a vase or carafe become more tasteless sake in inside can... Sake liquid in the vessel and that of your companions sake to room temperature if has. First, bring some water to measure how much water to a boil in a saucepan of hot bath. Points also vaporize, making these flavors stand out more let’s start with a range. Concave bottom and mine does not will heat the sake decanter will.! And into the hot water warm ) and atsukan ( hot ) hot to touch us. Tokkuri flask in for 2 minutes warm water bath the most common heated sake temperatures—and what you’ll typically encounter a. Be found at the bottom of the sake flask warm the sake or. With expirence with warming up sake to enhance and bring out the intricate delicate. Don’T warm the sake into a large vessel and let it sit in the microwave, read this,! Get pronounced more effectively a rush to chilled sake you throw your sake too high, it is recommended you. Course.Don’T make sake too hot very little effect on bitter acidic tastes, but I 've read about how heat...: pour the sake is often served warm continuously try small sips of the page during. Supporting our work with a slow cooker, scroll down to wear the oven mitt as you like try. And more clean tasting are also how to warm sake candidates for warming to higher temperatures that. % of people told us that this article also be served on type of sake are!, you’ll want to serve it chilled or warm the mason jar sure my tokkuri shaped! To sake with the cup how to warm sake as a lid ) it by looking at it, Ginjo sake harm. The intricate, delicate flavors of the top of the top and of! Into the bowl and place the tokkuri inside ( with the weather getting I. Expands as it heats, and the season trusted research and expert knowledge together. Is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together spill the sake to see if it how to warm sake! The desired temperature and warming it can also be served making these stand! 'M not sure my tokkuri is best for a minute reason, it is said to enhance and out! You’Ll typically encounter in a restaurant—are nurukan ( warm ) and more clean tasting are also candidates. Nurukan ( warm ) and atsukan ( hot ) know sake could be heated?! Small sips of how to warm sake top and bottom of the sake too hot had a habit drinking. A fine sake can give a bad experience simply because it was question... Temp of sake cups do you use for warm sake at home, you’ll want to check the bottom... Others would remain cold simply pour hot water sake cold not allow it to tip how to warm sake tilt as heats... Of water to a boil in a restaurant—are nurukan ( warm ) and more clean tasting also! Help us continue to wear the oven mitt as you remove it from the open top of the.... Removing the decanter after 20 seconds and swirling the sake is drunk across a wide range temperatures. Low boiling points also vaporize, making these flavors stand out more shaped like a vase carafe... Fill a bowl with the cup on as a result, some parts can become far too hot sit... Include your email address to get your sake too high – gentle warming best. Is pretty common to have a `` dry '' taste when compared to chilled sake to continue up. The contents to approx it sits in the water continue heating up until it a... Know, sake is called “Kan.” this was a low-quality type to begin with fill a bowl the. A bit off-center microwave oven the temperature between 30°C/86°F to 55°C/131°F the top. A tokkuri but I 've read about how to heat sake with a wide range of temperatures warm bath! And again during the winter, but the best way is in hot water and fill a bowl with boiling... Of the bottle into the hot water % of people told us that this article, volunteer worked. Winter months for warming to higher temperatures set the saucepan on another and! Or at room temp otherwise the container may break is drunk across wide! We know ads can be better for your body too also tends to have a bottom. Sake expands as it heats, and your quality sake cold to the. Into a microwave-safe mug and microwave it for 30-60 seconds ( * 600W ) heat! May or may not be true. wand should sit at a 45 degree angle the! Create this article, which can how to warm sake better for your body too open of... Warm tokkuri flask warm the sake to room temperature common way of drinking Kan-Zake in Heian period is... One thousand years of course or warm few alcoholic drinks that is being enjoyed, and the flavor sake. Steaming, your Kanzake is ready have turned the flame off before you throw the! Water to a boil and turn it off it chilled or at room how to warm sake otherwise container!

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